Bathing

Bathing

In the beginning it was unheard of that the tourists could bath in the sea, but that was just what they did. Therfor a huge hole was dug in the dunes west of Søndervig hotel, where pipes were lain directly to the sea. The meaning with this was to fil the hole with fresh sea water but the pipes did not function due to the sand, and the project was a failure. So, what to do? A couple of intellects went to Copenhagen to ask advice. The answer they recieved was “one must bath in the actual sea”. This conclusion brought a lot of joy to the locals and tourists alike.

So now the tourists would bath directly in the sea but with a strong rope thethered around them. In the other end of the rope was a heavy anchore burries deep in the sand. Up until the 1930’s it was strictly prohibited to bath in the sea without this rope securly fastened to you- called a bathingrope. The lifeguards on duty controlled this.

Inpropriety.

Men and women were not permitted to bath together, this was seen as improper. The story goes that a female teacher came shocked into the hotel to speak to the hostess, Mrs. Kristine Graversen. She said “the gentelmen are going into the water with the ladies, what will the outcome of this be?” to which the hostess replied “wet i presume!”

A small lady from the capital (Copenhagen) also came shocked and worried into the hotel one day, shouting that she had swallowed sea water, and worrying about what the outcome would be. “Dont worry little Miss” said the lifeguard, “there is pleanty of water left for the other guests.”

A room with full accomodation cost 7 Danish kroner in 1932, which ensured that it was the upper class that stayed at the Hotel. It was frequently advertised in the local newspapers when celebrities would visit the hotels in Søndervig

Kilde: Lokalhistorisk arkiv, Kloster

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